Posts Tagged ‘Communism’

Working on my new book … The Fight For Freedom

May 9, 2014

Not much time for blogging, as I am writing, writing, writing. Here’s the book I am working on:

19.3.2014 cover FFF - iPad cover (3)

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Ukraine: cut off and thirsting for contact with the world

February 23, 2014

I first published this blog after a visit to Ukraine in April 2010

The roads are broken up with potholes, the pavements are full of ice, slush and mud, the buildings are Soviet and not much works. The students I am teaching can’t speak much English or any other foreign language. The Schengen visa system makes travel to western Europe difficult, and few can afford it.

I am in the Ukraine. It means “borderlands,” and that’s what it is. One of my students asks me anxiously: “Do you think we are European?” I say: “Of course you are.” She is relieved. She was not sure she qualified, but she definitely does want to be one of us.

Excluded as Ukrainians largely are from contact with the West, they have an uphill task joining the modern world. The Institute for Human Development “Ukraine” in Kirovograd, a sprawling provincial city, is doing its best by inviting foreign teachers, but its internet service usually goes off in mid-afternoon because the service provider rations its kilobytes.

Nobody speaks nostalgically of the old days, but there is little sense that the collapse of Communism and the Soviet Union in 1990 was a turning point. Life did not change much. Now the oppressors are corrupt politicians, officials and businessmen. Individuals are unsure that they are empowered. Pessimism is the norm.

In the gloom of the fag end of an Eastern winter however shines the eternal Slav spirit – warm, hospitable and emotional. My journalism students snatch the western newspapers I have brought from my hand (the Swisscontact aid organisation has sent me). I give lessons in journalism, but what they really want to hear is how it is where I come from. They beam with pleasure that somebody has taken the trouble to come to them.

My hosts immerse me in culture. I eat bortsch and blinis with cottage cheese. Two of my students take me to a sauna, I buy a fur coat and I end up at the local beauty contest. I learn how to toast vodka: the first of the 39 traditional Ukrainian toasts is for good, the second for friends, the third for women, and after that nobody can remember any more.

After a couple of weeks, I am feeling quite at home.

A web site for my new book THE BUDAPEST HOUSE

February 11, 2014

The Budapest House cover

I have a new web site for my latest book, THE BUDAPEST HOUSE: A LIFE RE-DISCOVERED.

To learn about this moving true story of a woman seeking her roots in Central Europe, and to buy the book, go to  http://www.thebudapesthouse.com

I launch my new book, The Budapest House, A Life Re-Discovered, at an Oxford Book shop

November 25, 2013

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I have launched my new book, The Budapest House, A Life Re-Discovered, at the Summertown Book House in Oxford.

It’s about a woman of Hungarian origin who belatedly realises she lost half her family in Auschwitz, returns to discover her roots, and goes through personal dramas as she takes over her grandfather’s flat in Budapest. It’s a true story delving into some of Europe’s darkest and most sensitive history, ending on an uplifting and poignant note.

As for any author, the launch was a rite of passage. Waiting for the audience to arrive, feeling the buzz around the bookshop and presenting the book – these are unforgettable moments. Published by Crux Publishing, London. Available as paperback and ebook.

Now the book is delivered to the world! May it enjoy a long life and captivate those who hold it in their hands.

http://www.marcusferrar.org/index.html

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First media interview for my new book “The Budapest House: a Life Re-Discovered”

September 26, 2013

25.9.2013 Jewish Telegraph

 

 

 

 

 

 

See …

http://amzn.to/15hyS3x

My new book – The Budapest House: a Life Re-Discovered

September 8, 2013

The Budapest House cover

 

My third book – The Budapest House: a Life Re-Discovered – has been published!

A Hungarian traumatised by the loss of half her family in Auschwitz returns to Budapest to retrace her roots. She discovers a dramatic personal history that enables her eventually to shed the burden of her past and move forward to a new life.

The Budapest House is Europe’s house…. a poignant but unsentimental journey … Marcus Ferrar masterfully recounts moving personal stories against their wider historical backdrop and vividly evokes Budapest’s haunted past.

Adam LeBor, correspondent of The Economist and author of The Budapest Protocol

Available online on

http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Budapest-House-ebook/dp/B00ERDLXLQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1377803580&sr=1-1&keywords=the+budapest+house

and

http://www.amazon.com/The-Budapest-House-ebook/dp/B00ERDLXLQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1377803944&sr=1-1&keywords=the+budapest+house

Paperback version comes out in early October.

My other books are:
A Foot in Both Camps: a German Past For Better and For Worse (2012)

Slovenia 1945: Memories of Death and Survival After World War II (2005 – co-author John Corsellis)

The savage, idyllic Naked Island

July 1, 2009

And so to Goli Otok, the Naked Island. It’s a one day trip for tourists, there and back. In the old days, it was a one-way ticket for several years of penal labour and brainwashing.

Communists tormented Communists on this island. After he led the Yugoslav Partisans to victory in World War II, Tito was determined to remain independent of the Soviet Union. In every other country of Eastern Europe, Stalin exerted absolute power.

Tito knew there was only one language Stalin would understand. He had been brought up in Moscow in the 1930s when Stalin was purging the Soviet Communist Party of potential rivals. When the break came in 1948 therefore, Tito locked up all the pro-Moscow Yugoslav Communists and sent them to a cruel regime on this island in the Adriatic.

It worked. Stalin recognised a ruthless fellow-dictator. His Soviet successors came cap in hand in 1955 to make up with the Yugoslav. The Americans applauded an enemy of the Soviets, and obligingly bought the furniture made by the inmates of the penal colony.

Today one steps off the boat on to a dismally dilapidated site of watch towers, machine gun nests and ruined and pillaged workshops.

Some call it the “Croatian Alcatraz.” Yet it lacks the fearful sense of wickedness of the Alcatraz site off San Francisco. The prisoners planted a few patches of greenery. As one walks away from the man-made settlements, crickets buzz and the early summer sun shines brightly over the white rock. The blue sea around glistens.

Goli Otok symbolises the old Yugoslavia. Oppressive and cruel at times, yet ravishing to the senses. The boat’s siren sounds. My “term” is up after a couple of hours. By nightfall, Goli Otok will be deserted again.

See these pictures taken by a former inmate.


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